How about a ‘cuppa-o-tea’ this International Tea Day? Celebs in tinsel town go tea-licious!

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This International Tea Day, celebrities talk about their love for tea and what this drink means to them. If tea has any cultural significance in Indian households and how many cups are a must-have for them in a day. Read on…

Roshan Kapoor

Roshan Kapoor
Yes, I am a tea person. I start my day with ginger tea and it’s very important for me. If I feel low, have a headache or feel depressed, I have tea. If I am travelling I have tea at Chaayos, they make the tea according to our preference. I see a lot of people who don’t like tea and I feel how they survive without tea. When I was young, my family used to stop me from having tea, they would say that my skin colour would turn dark or something if I had a lot of tea. But I never stopped. I feel incomplete without tea. During summer, I even see people having cool drinks but I need my afternoon tea. It’s like an energy drink for me.

Rishina Kandhari

Rishina Kandhari
I am a chai lover. I drink five cups of tea a day and my day never starts without tea. I have jaggery tea and never add sugar to my tea. I carry chai from home and I love it most when made at home. It’s not just a drink, it’s an emotion. I love ginger tea during winter and the rainy season. Those cold breezy days and tea in the morning are a different kind of feeling altogether. It’s also so much having the tapri ki chai.

Charrul Malik

Charrul Malik
I would say my blood type is tea positive. An easy way to relieve stress in a matter of minutes, sit down with a nice cup of tea. The act of drinking tea can be calming, making it easier to take a breath and let all your worries float away—or, at least, to calm yourself before moving on with the rest of your day. I am a tea person. This drink means a lot to me. I remember during my college days when all of us came home in the evening, we used to sit and drink tea. I used to make tea for everyone and they used to love the tea. Tea brings everyone together and it’s our culture to sit and drink tea and bond over tea. Tea plays the most important role in connecting people together. I think it’s a feeling that binds everyone together and one will not love having tea alone but together with friends and family.

Anupama Solanki

Anupama Solanki
Yes, I drink tea but when I eat poha/bread pakoras or Samosas. However, at times when I’m shooting late at night, I drink occasionally. These days people are addicted to tea and somewhere this is very dangerous. If you drink within the limit then no problem, but people are drinking thrice or four times or way more than that in a day. Yes, there is no doubt I enjoy my tea but twice a day.

Gaurav Singh

Gaurav Singh
Tea holds immense cultural importance in India and is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the country. It is an integral part of our daily life and social interactions, often serving as a welcoming gesture to guests. I remember having tea coming from school and sitting with my family and siblings fighting over who gets to eat the biscuits and toast more. In Indian households, tea breaks are common and provide an opportunity for family members or friends to come together and share conversations. I always start my day with morning tea now and have green tea in the evening.

Mohit Malhotra

Mohit Malhotra
Tea means a lot to me because I actually like drinking tea, and I usually enjoy it with my mom. So it is a great significance of my morning with her because she loves to drink a lot of chai. When I’m in Delhi, I make sure that I have Chai and rusk along with her on our amazing balcony. And I like to dunk my biscuit in the tears and then eat it. So it’s incredible the thing that rusk becomes after I dip it in tea. I usually have like one or two cups a day, maximum.

Simaran Kaur

Simaran Kaur
I love tea, especially starting my day with a cup of tea is my routine. I remember since my childhood I used to sit with my family and siblings and have those morning and evening tea. Evenings used to be special as after the whole day of study and play, coming home for that cup of tea with Parle G and bun maska was my favourite. Tea has always held an important place in Indian households and will continue to in the coming generations. It’s like an addiction which helps people bond and sit and talk for hours and hours.

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